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Thread: Why are car audio speakers 4ohm?

  1. #11
    Senior Member minbari's Avatar
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    I think it is a simple matter of cost. in home or pro audio you have a nice 120volt AC power source. you can step that down or up to whatever voltage you need. so higher impedance speakers are just fine. You just feed them more voltage.

    In a car, a high voltage DC-DC convertor is expensive to make and potentially dangerous. (since 100VAC in the hands of a 16 y/o kid who knows nothing about electronics is a recipe for a youtube video :gr_grin

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Subwoofery View Post
    Is it stupid of me to think that less turn around the coil resulting in a lower impedance, can also mean lower inductance?

    Kelvin
    I think it was npdang that was saying the jump from 4 to 8 ohms in the VC also increases its sensitivity by appx 3dB, pretty much making up for any power loss.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by minbari View Post
    I think it is a simple matter of cost. in home or pro audio you have a nice 120volt AC power source. you can step that down or up to whatever voltage you need. so higher impedance speakers are just fine. You just feed them more voltage.

    In a car, a high voltage DC-DC convertor is expensive to make and potentially dangerous. (since 100VAC in the hands of a 16 y/o kid who knows nothing about electronics is a recipe for a youtube video :gr_grin
    I have to agree with Chad and minbari. The car electrical system is designed around portability, low battery voltage but high current capability. Home is designed around high voltage lower current. Transformers can be an expensive component, so the more windings the more expensive. They determine the maximum rail voltage used in an amp which combined with current limitations gives you a certain amount of power for each load. Most likely that was a deciding factor to reduce the amount of windings needed.

    There might have been a reasonable decision at the speaker level as well where it is a nice balance of power absorption, and efficiency since the coil can be the heaviest part of the mechanics reducing efficiency of a speaker. The longer the wiring in the coil, the higher the impedance.

  4. #14
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    even if an amp is rated@ 2 ohm stable, or even less, they're much happier at 4 ohms

  5. #15
    Big Daddy Chad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bark424 View Post
    even if an amp is rated@ 2 ohm stable, or even less, they're much happier at 4 ohms
    Thankfully the mentality around this place would not warrant argument to that statement

  6. #16
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    In layman's terms, why? For any amp? Even ones with intelligent step down circuits like JL RIPS?

  7. #17
    Big Daddy Chad's Avatar
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    Not even sure it's worth going down that road because everybody's brother's friend has an amp that ran just fine at 1/4 ohm on paper.

  8. #18
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    It's really a moot point unless you're running arrays or something to that effect.

    Single, point source driver and you have so many other problems than how much power you need.
    Just because you don't understand the data doesn't mean it's not relevant.

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