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Thread: Dual prong woofer question

  1. #1
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    Dual prong woofer question

    Had a question for you all. Now this may be elementary to some, if not most, of you. However, on woofers with dual prongs on a single input side, if something is wired on the additional inputs, does it affect the ohm load(ie, make it run as a parallel load?)? Also, if you solder additional wires for output onto a speakers input terminals does this also affect the ohm load that the amp sees(ie, parallel load?)? Thanks in advance.

    Al
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    Controller AL9000's Avatar
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    Do you mean this type of terminal?

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    The extra prongs are to send signal out to an additional speaker so you can run them parallel. If there is no other driver, then there is no change in the ohm value. There would be no point in hooking two channels of a single amp to both terminals, and could possibly burn up the amp unless both channels were run in mono and the gains were set perfectly. The proper way to hook it up would be to bridge the amp and run one set of wires to the speaker and forget about the other tabs.


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    A. Yes
    B. I agree with what you're saying, but that is not my intent(to run two channels on one speaker).

    I ask because I have an older set of phoenix gold components that claim to be 4ohm and it has this type of connector that provides output to the tweeter. Both drivers claim to be 4ohm, so I wonder why this doesn't present a 2ohm load in this configuration? Also, based on those components, is it then possible to do this in a more simple manner(soldering output wires from a driver that has a single set of outputs to power another driver, like a tweeter)?

    Thanks,
    Al

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    Controller AL9000's Avatar
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    Yes, if you add another speaker driver to the extra tab, it would be 2Ω. The extra tab just makes it easier for people who crimp on blade connectors rather than solder.

    Most component sets come with an external passive crossover, which takes the signal from the amp and has two outputs for the tweet and mid. I'm assuming that your tweeter has some sort of crossover filter attached?


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    I agree with all that you've said, but I'm just not understanding why these components were not presenting a 2ohm load. Bear in mind, these comps were driven by the stock headunit-not an external amp. I also dont believe the hu was 2ohm stable(2000 galant,non-infinity, 4ohm speakers). The box said they were 4ohm, so I'm just trying to figure it because neither driver was 8ohm, they were both 4.....hmmm.

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    Controller AL9000's Avatar
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    Read my previous post. Yes, if you add the tweeter in parallel (the other tabs), then the amp would see a 2 ohm load.


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    Founding Member n_olympios's Avatar
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    Don't forget, it is nominal impedance.
    Nick
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    Controller AL9000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by n_olympios View Post
    Don't forget, it is nominal impedance.
    Correct. A speaker is only 4 ohms when it's not hooked up to anything ;)


  10. #10
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    I think you are leaving some critical info out of this discussion.

    1) Impedance of a given speaker is frequency-dependant

    When dual-prong terminals are used to add a tweeter to a mid-bass speaker in parallel, the tweeter is typically going to be wired with a capacitor that prevents low frequencies from reaching the tweeter (the most basic "crossover").

    Typically the impedance of the mid-bass driver rises at higher frequencies that it cannot reproduce (partially due to the inductance of the voice coil itself). Conversely - the impedance of the cap-coulped tweeter is high at low frequencies.

    Thus, when the cap-coupled tweeter and mid-bass speaker are combined, they still represent a nominal 4-ohm load to the amp (not 2-ohms).

    So, in other words, *if* you wire the tweeter to the extra terminals *via a capacitor or other passive crossover*, then the combined tweeter and mid-bass speaker will still represent a nominal 4-ohm load to the amp - not 2-ohms.

    On the other hand, if you wire two *identical* speakers in parallel (like two identical subs, or two voice coils on a dual voice coil sub), then nominal impedance will be cut in half.
    Last edited by jepalan; 07-01-2013 at 02:47 PM.

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