Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 48

Thread: Metal Fabrication Discussion

  1. #11
    Founding Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    103
    I'm tuning in for this discussion. I have absolutely nonexperience with metal work or welding. This will be the next step I take with my fabrication education. From what I have seen, even a few very basic skills can go a long way. I'm going to keep my eyes and ears open for a bandsaw, miter saw and welder.

    While on the subject, the only time I ever used a welder was a wire feed unit in my auto tech class way back in high school. I remember the thing being a complete POS that never seemed to work (the wire feed was always binding). I guess I have been intimidated with this kind of equipment since as I don't want to get stuck with something that is high maintenance and never works. Any recs for a basic but reliable starter unit a newb should look into to get started with metal fab? Any brands or designs one should stick away from? How quickly do you go through tanks of gas? Where do you refill them? Is the gas expensive?

    Thanks for this topic!
    -Trevor

  2. #12
    Founding Member benny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    211
    A heavy steel table is really nice to have, and a wide assortment of these:



    Heavy ones, none of that sissy carpenter stuff :p

  3. #13
    Founding Member benny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    211
    A sticky feed on a MIG machine is usually a gunked up whip from running shitty rusted wire through it. My father always used to take a bulldog clip and a scotchbrite pad and clamp it on the wire between the rollers and the entrance to the whip. It would clean the wire before it got into the liner.

  4. #14
    Founding Member 86mr2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    286
    I had a Miller 120V mig for years. It did everything I needed and was completely reliable. A tank of Argon mix lasted me a couple of years usually. At the time Lincoln had one advantage - continuously variable voltage. The Miller had a 4-position switch. The deciding factor was I got the Lincoln used for $500 less than the Lincoln (none available used at the time). As much as I enjoy gas welding, once I had the mig, I didn't really gas weld any more. Of course, I wasn't an artist with gas, I could never get the beautiful concentric waves I should have.

    Too many years hanging around toolmakers, reading Home Shop Machinist and hanging out on rec.crafts.metalworking has made me a big fan of fabrication from plate and bar - then you can just bolt everything together with spiffy socket head capscrews. Of course you need access to a bandsaw and milling machine.

  5. #15
    Founding Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    103
    Thank you both! I'm going to start combing CL for a good used unit. I had no idea a tank of argon mix lasted that long (of course I'm sure it depends in how much you use it which in my case will not be much). I was thinking it was going to be like my propane tank on my BBQ which I go through like once a month.
    -Trevor

  6. #16
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,578
    Real Name
    Adam
    Quote Originally Posted by amitaF View Post
    Adam, what will be the heaviest gauge, you expect to weld? And are you looking at 120volt or 240v MIG units? If you plan on welding thin stuff, do yourself a favor and get a gas bottle/regulator set-up. Flux-core leaves alot of slag in the welds when it is used on really light stuff. Also, Your lungs will thank you.
    I'm probably looking for a 140-180a unit so I'm riding the line between 115v and 220v. It really just comes down to what I find on CL. If someone is unloading a Millermatic 180 or Hobart 187 I'd be thrilled, but I'd probably be just find with a 140.

    I might talk to some of my metal fab contractors and see what sort of deals they can get, or see if they have any units they've outgrown. I can't remember the last time I saw something other than Miller on their trucks.
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  7. #17
    Big Daddy Chad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    East-Central Illinois
    Posts
    1,570
    all this welder talk is making me want to spend some money.. Money I can't spend because Big Daddy needs a new well.

  8. #18
    Founding Member finbar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    15
    Real Name
    John
    For chopping up mild steel I have had good luck with the circular saw / ferrous cutting blade. I buy locally but they are available online.
    Amazon.com: MK Morse CSM72550SC Metal Devil 7-1/4-Inch 50 Tooth Steel Cutting Saw Blade with 5/8-Inch and Diamond Knockout Arbor: Gateway
    would be an example.
    I have also used Tenryu blades with good results.
    There is lots of hot shrapnel using this. Don't tuck your shirt in. Waaay noisy too.

  9. #19
    Founding Member benny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    211
    damn, whats wrong with a 5" Makita and some 0.045" zipcut discs?

  10. #20
    Big Daddy Chad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    East-Central Illinois
    Posts
    1,570
    Quote Originally Posted by benny View Post
    damn, whats wrong with a 5" Makita and some 0.045" zipcut discs?
    nothing

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •