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Thread: Router Bits

  1. #11
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Ordered the following from MLCS. Should be a decent addition to my modest hodgepodge other bits.

    Chamfer bit #7675 5/8" CL #7675
    Spiral Upcut #5146 1/4" #5146
    Plunge Cutting Straight 1/2" - 1/2" shank #7753
    Round Over bit 1/4" radius - 1/2" shank #8652
    Shear Angle Straight Bit 1/2" LD 1/2" Shank #7792
    Flush Trim Bit w/ Top & Bottom Mounted Bearing 1/4" Shank #6513
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
    Also agreed. I'd argue that the jigs are more important than the bits. As an amateur this may be a misguided opinion, but I would rather have a perfectly aligned table and perfect jigs
    Can't possibly agree more... Quality bits are definitely an asset, but they're value is lost when the tools use to guide their path are sloppy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
    I believe the advantage is less deflection under load, not rotating mass.
    That's what I've been lead to believe as well. Coming from the school of multiple rough cuts followed by a light finishing pass. I don't have the need for the advantage a 1/2" shank provides.

  3. #13
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    I too am of the multiple light pass school. Any other way with red oak (which I consider by far more difficult to work with than expensive exotics) and the finished product for me is a total disaster.

    I also come from the school of a couple very light passes right at the beginning to score the cut line, to reduce chipout. Then crank out the bulk.

  4. #14
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    Adam, though I don't suppose you'll need it right away, the reason the patternmaker is more valuable to me than the flush trim is because it is a fluted plunge, just with a flush bearing at the bottom of the cutters. In short, I can make a stop-depth cut where the sides are guided by a jig.

    Really, I don't much use the flushcut trim bit unless I'm cutting 1/4" hardboard jigs or, well, formica trim.

  5. #15
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
    I also come from the school of a couple very light passes right at the beginning to score the cut line, to reduce chipout. Then crank out the bulk.
    I do a very light pass for the same reason and the additional benefit of being able to double check all of the measurements before I get too far in.

    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
    Adam, though I don't suppose you'll need it right away, the reason the patternmaker is more valuable to me than the flush trim is because it is a fluted plunge, just with a flush bearing at the bottom of the cutters. In short, I can make a stop-depth cut where the sides are guided by a jig.

    Really, I don't much use the flushcut trim bit unless I'm cutting 1/4" hardboard jigs or, well, formica trim.
    Good points. I'll pick up a patternmaker next time I place an order.
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  6. #16
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    Flush trims are extremely handy for cleaning up edges though.... When rabbeting a panel for a joint it easily cuts (no pun intended) the rabbit set-up in half. Once you embrace to the idea of using the flush trim bit. You'll just over shoot your rabbit cut, clue/clamp, and clean it up after the fact. The time saved is really incredible....

    Of course there are many ways to skin a cat..., I'm just saying a flush trim certainly isn't a bad buy for the rookie woodworker.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
    Adam, though I don't suppose you'll need it right away, the reason the patternmaker is more valuable to me than the flush trim is because it is a fluted plunge, just with a flush bearing at the bottom of the cutters. In short, I can make a stop-depth cut where the sides are guided by a jig.
    Another method to consider rather than the standard patternmaker, is the use of a simple upcut with a guide set. The guide set quickly attaches to the bottom of your router, and is meant to be a substitute for the bearing guide the patternmaker has.



    The bonus in this case, is that your pattern jig can be used to recreate the same pattern, but in varying sizes. This comes in very handy for things like mortise templates.

  8. #18
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    ^^^

    Thanks, I'll take a look at those.
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  9. #19
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    Or inlays

  10. #20
    Adam, pretty good post on the router forum Im on
    If I were to buy 4 or 5 router bits - Router Forums

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