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Thread: Router Bits

  1. #1
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Router Bits

    I need to pick up a few more router bits and I was standing at Home Depot this morning trying to decide which ones I need. I walked away empty handed because I definitely wasn't paying their list prices for the Diablo bits when I think MLCS bits are perfectly fine for my needs.

    So the question I have for you guys is "What router bits do you use most often, or which bits wouldn't you want to be without?".

    On my list so far are:

    Chamfer (45 degree 5/16 depth)
    Plunge cut straight bit (1/2")
    New flush trim bits
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  2. #2
    Tester Extraordinaire ErinH's Avatar
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    Rabbeting bit set w/various sized bearings. Something like this:
    Rockler Rabbeting Bit Set - Rockler Woodworking Tools
    Of course, there are different sets with various cut diameter/depth so go with the kit that suits you best. I prefer this over making passes (although sometimes I still have to ).


    Tongue & Groove:
    Freud Adjustable Tongue & Groove Bit Set - Rockler Woodworking Tools
    ^ I've borrowed a set one time to make a false floor that slid and locked into place. Was really cool. Never had a need otherwise, but I'm sure I could have come up with uses had I owned a set myself.



    You pretty much covered the rest.
    Your ears: The best tools you have... and they're free, too!

  3. #3
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    -1/4" spiral upcut bit (mostly because I use the jasper circle jig so often)
    -1/4" roundover bit
    -1/2" roundover bit
    -1/2" flush trim bit

    I have found I use these more than any.
    -Trevor

  4. #4
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    I'm with trevor. Swap the flush trim with the patternmaker and add the very nice rabbet bit with assorted bearings and these are the workhorses for my router.

    Next up are the flushcut trim bits (two, one with short flutes and one with long flutes) and the 3/4" roundover. The rest follow at distant 3rd and down.

  5. #5
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    That is definitely next on my wish list, a good rabbet bit.

    Not so much a bit, but I also make frequent use of my template guides; very handy.
    Last edited by trevordj; 09-25-2010 at 12:41 PM.
    -Trevor

  6. #6
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    Also agreed. I'd argue that the jigs are more important than the bits. As an amateur this may be a misguided opinion, but I would rather have a perfectly aligned table and perfect jigs and 1/4" shaft cheap (but well sharpened/honed) bits than a messy table with a messy fence and the most outstanding boutique 1/2" shaft bits with their perfect long lasting cutting edges.

  7. #7
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Thanks for the good insights thus far.

    Since shank size was mentioned, do you guys typically go for 1/2" shanks? I'm certainly not buying boutique bits, but I have preferred the 1/2" shank bits I've used and with most MLCS bits, it's about $1 extra. Advantages I see are more rotating mass, more surface area at the collet, and potentially better heat dissipation.

    Disadvantage is that I occasionally have to swap collets in the table to use a couple existing bits, but that situation exists already.
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  8. #8
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    I believe the advantage is less deflection under load, not rotating mass.

  9. #9
    Tester Extraordinaire ErinH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterabbit View Post
    I believe the advantage is less deflection under load, not rotating mass.
    that's what she said
    Your ears: The best tools you have... and they're free, too!

  10. #10
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    I have a coworker that says that at least three times a day, sometimes it is appropriate, sometimes less so.

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