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Thread: Sound Localization

  1. #1
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Sound Localization

    Cubdenno sent me this link earlier today and it prompted me to want to make a thread about the topic of Sound Localization.

    So, as a starting point we've got the article above, which I've added to the "master list" thread. Pretty good intro to Interaural Level Difference, Interaural Time Difference, Anatomical Transfer Function, Rooms and Reflections, and The Precedence Effect.

    Anyone have other good online articles? Floyd Toole's book has a lot of good info on the subject, so I'll look to see how much of it is available in the google preview.

    Thought this was an interesting segment about the way a reverberant environment can change the way our brain weights the various mechanisms for localization.

    Of course, the ILD accuracy is adversely affected by standing waves in a room, but here the second advantage of the ILD appears: Almost every reflecting surface has the property that its acoustical absorption increases with increasing frequency; as a result, the reflected power becomes relatively smaller compared to the direct power. Because the binaural neurophysiology is capable of using ILDs across the audible spectrum with equal success, it is normally to the listenerís advantage to use the highest frequency information that can be heard. Experiments in highly reverberant environments find listeners doing exactly that, using cues above 8000 Hz. A statistical decision theory analysis using ILDs and ITDs measured with a manikin shows that the pattern of localization errors observed experimentally can be understood by assuming that listeners rely entirely on ILDs and not at all on ITDs. This strategy of reweighting localization cues is entirely unconscious.
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

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  2. #2
    Tester Extraordinaire ErinH's Avatar
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    ^ I have that link bookmarked. I believe I posted it up on emsq in the 'good reads' thread.
    Here's some more from that same thread:
    Who We Are


    And, actually, Wikipedia's page on the subject is pretty straightforward:
    Sound localization - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I like the part where they explain why dogs tilt their heads to pick up on certain sounds. ;)
    Your ears: The best tools you have... and they're free, too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam View Post
    Almost every reflecting surface has the property that its acoustical absorption increases with increasing frequency; as a result, the reflected power becomes relatively smaller compared to the direct power.
    Glass too? Because that's what we really care about in the vehicle.

  4. #4
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkZ View Post
    Glass too? Because that's what we really care about in the vehicle.

    Nope. Actually the inverse with glass. Check out this absorption coefficient chart: Coefficient Chart
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  5. #5
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    Neato chart, Adam.

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