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Thread: Cutting Circles

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJ Mobile Audio View Post
    Jay, that's a good idea. So are you suggesting to brad nail a small cross piece on the inside side of your baffle before cutting the hole? This would take some forethought on an enclosure but would definitely improve the results. For mission-critical holes, I have occasionally attached the piece being cut to a sacrificial board in a similar manner.

    Mission-critical as in this:

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    Not exactly. I usually take the piece I'm cutting my circles out of, and brad nail it to the piece of wood I'm usually using as a table. Once I pry the rings off, the brads stay in there and the bottom piece of wood is left usable.

    As far as Mission critical stuff, let me throw up some pics of a speaker grille I made to match the wheels I was going to buy for my old Neon...





    I made a template out of poster board. Then I marked it off and cut it oversize with a jigsaw. Then I used some hot glue with some scrap pieces of wood with straight edges and lined them up with my lines. Then I used a flush trim bit to straighten everything up.




    The hot glue holds pretty well and then separates easily with a paint scraper.

    Jay

  2. #12
    So wait, why no dovetail joints?

    Seriously, did you think of just using a hubcap? Looks like your "tire" is a little flat in that last pic. For the sake of realism you should have put one of those little balancing weights on the edge.

    By "mission critical" I simply meant I wouldn't have access to the holes after the enclosure was assembled. Those little nubs would have made for an unhappy customer. I wasn't claiming the holes were anything overly complex (though the box design certainly was). Mission critical also means that plywood was $75/sheet, and I bid the job for two sheets with no significant waste.
    Last edited by TJ Mobile Audio; 06-22-2011 at 06:54 PM.
    Experiments should be repeatable: they should fail the same way every time.

  3. #13
    Devil's Advocate Adam_MSS's Avatar
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    Damn, Jay. That is some really impressive MDF work. I don't ever think I've routed that many consecutive edges without some form of screwup.
    You don't use science to show that you're right, you use science to become right. - R.Munroe

    The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them. - W.L.Bragg



  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TJ Mobile Audio View Post
    So wait, why no dovetail joints?

    Seriously, did you think of just using a hubcap? Looks like your "tire" is a little flat in that last pic. For the sake of realism you should have put one of those little balancing weights on the edge.

    By "mission critical" I simply meant I wouldn't have access to the holes after the enclosure was assembled. Those little nubs would have made for an unhappy customer. I wasn't claiming the holes were anything overly complex (though the box design certainly was). Mission critical also means that plywood was $75/sheet, and I bid the job for two sheets with no significant waste.
    Gotcha. I wasn't sure exactly what you meant by mission critical.

    Besides the 'hubcap' was like 50% smaller than normal.

    Jay

  5. #15
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    Thanks!

  6. #16
    BTW, x2 on what Adam said, I was just busting your chops...
    Experiments should be repeatable: they should fail the same way every time.

  7. #17
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    Nice thread, just need some sunshine and off I go

    Any tips for cuting straight edges anyone? I've tried making a guide, for my hand held circular saw, with some clamps and a straight piece of timber-didn't work terribly well and I've a T-TQWT to knock up when said sun comes out! Could use the saw or a router for that-suggestions welcome!

    Also, the T-TQWT will be housing a pair of KEF B139s-any tips for cutting "ovals"-they aren't quite oval, more like a circle extended in the middle!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBaronGroog View Post
    Nice thread, just need some sunshine and off I go

    Any tips for cuting straight edges anyone? I've tried making a guide, for my hand held circular saw, with some clamps and a straight piece of timber-didn't work terribly well and I've a T-TQWT to knock up when said sun comes out! Could use the saw or a router for that-suggestions welcome!

    Also, the T-TQWT will be housing a pair of KEF B139s-any tips for cutting "ovals"-they aren't quite oval, more like a circle extended in the middle!
    Something like this is real common for cutting straight lines with a circular saw: How to Build a Simple Circular Saw Guide for Straighter Cuts - Popular Mechanics

  9. #19
    timber doesn't tend to be straight in my experience: Aluminium (such as the alfer stuff) is my weapon of choice for guides. Plus Axminster (in the UK) do some relatively straight guides that aren't massively expensive.

    - Bret

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    Something like this is real common for cutting straight lines with a circular saw: How to Build a Simple Circular Saw Guide for Straighter Cuts - Popular Mechanics
    Thanks for that, my attempt wasn't far off-I just didn't have the two bottom pieces (PLY and right angled piece) and crappy looking clamps compared to those! Will invest in some more clamps and give it a crack.

    Quote Originally Posted by bretti_kivi View Post
    timber doesn't tend to be straight in my experience: Aluminium (such as the alfer stuff) is my weapon of choice for guides. Plus Axminster (in the UK) do some relatively straight guides that aren't massively expensive.

    - Bret
    Thanks again, you mean items like these?
    Buy Axminster Cutting Guide from Axminster, fast delivery for the UK
    Buy United Heavy Duty Clamp Cutting Guide from Axminster, fast delivery for the UK

    Any experience with those? Or is there one you'd recommend?

    TBH the self made tool Doug recommended actually looks better!

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