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Thread: 20 + year old baked on oem pads. Better to put cld over it or take it off first.

  1. #1
    Member drtool's Avatar
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    20 + year old baked on oem pads. Better to put cld over it or take it off first.

    I feel it is better to take it off with a heat gun then clean it up with remover. That way you get a better bond to the substrate. I have been known to waste my time being to picky too. What do you all do?

  2. #2
    gyroscopes and infrared FoxForce's Avatar
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    What does is say when you knock it (literally, not figuratively).

    Anyone else notice there's no OEM constraind layer damping sandwiching out there? I've personally never seen it, just the baked on extensional-type hard rubber stuff I think drtool's talking about here.

  3. #3
    Member drtool's Avatar
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    Yes the baked on hard rubber stuff. I can tell it is still working when I knock on it. The top of the baked on stuff has seen better days so I figure CLD might begin to lose it's bond over time. If and when that happens now I am just transporting more dead weight besides my dead ass. I figure do it once and do it right that is why I have been taking the old stuff off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FoxForce View Post
    What does is say when you knock it (literally, not figuratively).

    Anyone else notice there's no OEM constraind layer damping sandwiching out there? I've personally never seen it, just the baked on extensional-type hard rubber stuff I think drtool's talking about here.
    I've seen a lot of it, mostly in GM and Chrysler vehicles, but many others as well. It's almost always applied as a Band-Aid to areas that resonate more than the computer models predicted. It's a lot less expensive to use the stuff that goes through the bake. Some of the hard stuff is vibration damper but a lot of it is meant to stiffen the panels. Then there's the amazing asphalt stuff that is still being used on floors. Amazing that it's crap and I've seen it on the floors of very expensive vehicles.

    Using OEM practices as a guide doesn't really make sense. If the vehicle was designed from the ground up to be quiet, it was done in ways we can't replicate. For mass market vehicles, it's whatever can be done cheaply without adding weight. I'm starting to believe that a lot of it is only meant to last until the car rolls off the lot. A kid who works next door had a weird buzzing sound in his 6 month old Dodge pickup. We pulled the headliner and there were 4 4"X12" strips of asphalt impregnated cardboard glued to the roof with a very thin viscoelastic adhesive that looked like what you see on vinyl extensional dampers. The bond had failed, all of the strips were hanging down and laying on the headliner.

    To drtool's question, there is nothing to be gained by putting vibration damper on top of vibration damper. My rule of thumb is if it's on there solidly and in decent shape, leave it alone. Just treat the bare metal. The floor needs less vibration damper than any other part of the car - especially if you will be adding a barrier. Even if you aren't, floors are usually very well reinforced. The noise you hear is air borne, not panel resonance.

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