Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Nomenclature difference between home and car?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    430

    Nomenclature difference between home and car?

    Why is there differences in crossover nomenclature between home and car guys? When a home guy says to cross a tweeter over "high" to a mid, they are talking like 3500 hertz. Crossing a tweeter over high to a mid for a car guy would be like at least an octave above that.

    Conversely crossing a tweeter over low in the home world is like at 1500-1700 hertz and the car guys is an octave above that.

    I was looking at Zaph's page with the car version/setup of his 5s and the Seas neo metal dome...he has it crossed at 1800 hertz 4th order. The polars look great, and I guess he wouldn't do a xo point like that if the distortion levels would be too high for the tweeter. But I guess the down side would be output levels and power handling playing that low.

    Why do us car guys do things so differently than the home world?

  2. #2
    Founding Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Upstate Ny
    Posts
    180
    If I had to guess it would be that usually the tweeter is on axis with the woofer and within a few inches. that and home audio tweeters are usually bigger... just a guess.
    Daily driver- 06 Tc. w205-h701. Zuki Eleets hybrid 5 channel. Peerless SDS mids, Arc Black series tweeters. Stereo Integrity BM.

    Toy- 95' Lexus Sc300 Build coming soon!

  3. #3
    Founding Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    496
    Quote Originally Posted by winslow View Post
    Why do us car guys do things so differently than the home world?
    environmental limitations?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    430
    I thought that too, but then Zaph has his car "kit" for his 5 that has the little Seas neo crossed at about 1800 hertz. I know the metal cone mid has a resonance, but that seems awefully low to run that tweeter.

    Then again we might like a bit more blistering volume than home guys?

  5. #5
    Founding Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    496
    I would argue less. Any time I meter a car at the same apparent loudness as a home the home meters way way louder. Or put another way, 90 dB of midrange in a house is not 90 dB of midrange in a car. In my experience.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    430
    I agree, just more space to energize in the house.

    I just find it odd that we in the car world do things so much differently than in the home in this regard, especially with circumstances where the mids are close/next to the tweeters.

    Then again most car marketed tweeters are chamberless and probably have a high Fs...but how many of us on these boards use "car" marketed speakers unless we have to?

  7. #7
    Tester Extraordinaire ErinH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    I just wonder if it has to do with the reflection issues and typical install locations in a car (ie: pillar mounted, dash firing tweeters).
    Your ears: The best tools you have... and they're free, too!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    430
    Maybe controlling directivity some in a crude way?

  9. #9
    Founding Member Subwoofery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    353
    Real Name
    Kelvin
    Quote Originally Posted by winslow View Post
    Maybe controlling directivity some in a crude way?
    That's exactly what I was thinking: controlling dispersion.

    And if I had to guess, that can be mostly due to the fact that a lot of guyz separate the midrange and the tweeter. Unless it's Xover high, the tweeter is better off within a distance of 1/4 wavelength at the crossover point from the midrange.

    Kelvin

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •